Kim Kelley: I cannot believe that we are already on our seventh podcast episode for pepelwerk. This is Kim Kelley, the CEO and co-founder. Today, and actually this week, we are going to feature interviews with our talent users. Today I have with me Aubrey Kelley. Aubrey, say hello.

Aubrey Kelley: Hi.

Kim Kelley: So Aubrey, I want you to … I’m going to walk you through a couple questions just to be able to get your experience in the work market and what you’re hoping to get from pepelwerk. Is that all right?

Aubrey Kelley: Yeah, that’s fine.

Kim Kelley: Okay. So first tell me what you have … Or how you have been trying to get a job.

Aubrey Kelley: Well, right now I have just been on some job posting sites like Indeed and ZipRecruiter, CareerBuilder. I even looked on Craigslist whenever I got desperate sometimes, but those are just the main job posting sites that I’m on right now.

Kim Kelley: And because you are a college graduate and you’re hoping to get your first I guess what you would call is a real job, right, instead of kind of a … Just kind of a survival job, when you were at the university did you have any career services or any connections directly with employers that you got to explore too?

Aubrey Kelley: Yeah. They did have career fairs I went to. They just had different companies come and you got to walk around and talk to different companies and see what opportunities interest you. There’s nothing big or outside of the norm than maybe if I wanted to work at Apple or volunteer somewhere. It just didn’t seem like the next level thing. It just seemed more of like a high school level career fair.

Kim Kelley: Oh, so the career fair in itself was just pretty much a booth of … I mean I run to a booth and give my resume and then I run to a booth and give my resume? I have no idea what you have to offer me, but I’m going to kind of walk around and try to present myself in hopes that you’ll pay attention to me?

Aubrey Kelley: Right.

Kim Kelley: Okay. So you’ve tried all of the common ways. You are a college graduate. You went to a great university. You experienced a career fair. What has been the biggest or most surprising reality of getting a job?

Aubrey Kelley: I would say the process of getting a job and getting connected to opportunities. I thought that if I typed in a search engine on these job sites something I was looking for, then it would help connect me to real jobs and real opportunities, when at the end of the day I end up maybe hearing back from one of the 10 that I’ve applied to. It’s just a very rigorous and time consuming process, and I didn’t think that it would be this hard to just get an entry level job in a big corporate company if that’s something that I wanted.

Kim Kelley: Why do you think that is? Why do you think that you use all these tools and you kind of ended up empty handed?

Aubrey Kelley: I just think that whatever algorithm these companies are using doesn’t necessarily work in the talent’s favor and it’s not necessarily for the talent. I just feel like it’s a place for a bunch of people to post their jobs and pay to have them seen, but the resume process of how you create your profile on these jobs doesn’t really allow you to really shine in the ways that you can. It just limits you to what you’ve done, even though that’s not where you’re trying to go.

Kim Kelley: Okay. That makes sense. I have to ask the big question, because as a college student that went into debt to get her education and is now struggling to get a job with a fair income, with a fair salary, do you regret going to college?

Aubrey Kelley: Not at all, just because it was a great learning experience and I think I learned a lot more than just what I got my degree in. I got my degree in kinesiology and with that, with just a bachelors, you can do personal training and maybe be a teacher, but anything else outside of that I would basically have to go back to school, which I don’t necessarily want to do.

Aubrey Kelley: But going to college to get my bachelors is definitely worth it to me, because I do think it opens up some more doors than it would if I didn’t go, and I do think it taught me things that if I never went life skill wise I would have never learned.

Kim Kelley: Yeah, it’s interesting, I always think that you pay for an education because you are hoping that it connects you to get a return on your money and sometimes it really is just learning through the life experiences that being in college gives you that it’s going to be hard to replicate. But if you were to ask the college to do one thing differently for you what would it be?

Aubrey Kelley: Just to connect the college graduates or the seniors in college to the opportunities that are in their area or have companies that do welcome recent college graduates who are looking to get into a career and build off that career.

Aubrey Kelley: I just wish they did something to bridge the gap between that, because it’s just kind of … They’re out there, but getting in touch with them and getting connected with them seems kind of impossible. And if they could just help with that, that would do a lot.

Kim Kelley: Well, and one of the things for people which … You know, it’s weird, in the talent space you have a lot … I mean it’s ridiculous how many software systems and just fly-by-night websites are out there trying to connect people with talent, and unfortunately I think it’s a lot more noise, because everyone just seems to get further and further saturated.

Kim Kelley: Now of course I want everyone to be on pepelwerk, but it’s not a selfish reason. It’s a functional reason because you’re not being able to connect with employers at the right time or even choose the education that is in demand because we’re all scattered. You know, we’re all everywhere.

Kim Kelley: So I know for me and my commitment to you as a talent is to hopefully bridge that gap and actually get ahead of some of those education decision-making points so that you know whether or not even that education or that course is something to invest in, because there may not … You know, it may be harder than you think to get a job in the field that you like, and obviously hard things are always worthwhile. You don’t want to give up because things are difficult, but you also want to be realistic. So then how did you eventually get a job?

Aubrey Kelley: Well, I basically just got onto pepelwerk and I created my profile, which was really refreshing, because I didn’t have to fill out this resume of how I was a server in high school or did all these things that really pertained nothing to what I was trying to get into after being a college graduate.

Aubrey Kelley: I really basically just filled out what my skills were, what I was able to do, what I wanted to do, and from there I just matched with a job within like three days. It was really nice. I had my interview on the app itself, which was really nice, because I’ve driven to so many interviews, two or three interviews back-to-back, whatever, and ended up not getting the job, and I wasted a week and gas and my time, so-

Kim Kelley: And the lovely resume versioning, right? You had to write how many versions of resumes just to get-

Aubrey Kelley: I had to print out at least 10 resumes for the jobs that I was applying to, so to not have to print anything out or drive anywhere and waste gas or waste my time or wait, you know, a month until I even heard back to whether or not they got my application, it was really nice.

Kim Kelley: Okay. Well I am grateful that you have a job because that’s obviously what pepelwerk is all about, but if you had to give any advice to potential talent users that maybe … Or just our audience, maybe it’s mom that’s listening, maybe it’s a teacher that’s listening, maybe it’s an employer that’s listening, what would you beg out of every one of those key contributors to changing our work life … What would you beg them to pay attention to?

Aubrey Kelley: I think I would just really want them to pay attention to the way our generation is going about getting work and finding what they want to do. It’s just becoming … It’s becoming really hard for our generation to figure out how our parents or our grandparents got their jobs and got where they were without all this technology, and the fact that we have all this technology at our fingertips and that’s kind of what we’ve been growing up using, to not have it help us with the job process is really confusing and it really sucks.

Aubrey Kelley: So if they could just pay attention to how our generation is trying to get connected to work, because it’s not that we don’t want to and it’s not that we don’t have the skills to, but to set us up for success in that way and really provide us with the right tools would help a lot.

Kim Kelley: Okay. Well I know that pepelwerk is checking off almost everything on your list, so I’m really excited that we are providing the technology, we are listening to you to just make your skills be your voice instead of you being judged on your experience or expertise, because you’re learning, right?

Aubrey Kelley: Right.

Kim Kelley: And not just you, but anybody who’s trying to … Even if you’re a programmer or you’re somebody who’s in a creative field, or if you have a trade skill and maybe you’re a nurse, all of those types of jobs are skills [inaudible 00:11:06], and the only way to get that all connected is to get everyone to come join the people at our party.

Kim Kelley: Of course that’s how I’ll end this podcast, is a call to action. If you’re an employer register to be an employer member. It’s a direct environment for our talent so that they can get the kind of rewards that Aubrey has experienced.

Kim Kelley: So, Aubrey, any final words for our audience today?

Aubrey Kelley: Yeah. Just get on pepelwerk, because it has totally changed the game for me and totally made me realize what could actually be possible.

Kim Kelley: Good. All right everyone, thank you again for listening. Make sure you put your comments or responses or any additional subjects you want to hear about into our comment box and follow us on social media. Remember we give you the tools, it’s up to you how you use them.